Regina High to Close
at the End of 2009-2010 School Year

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Faced with a steady decline in enrollment and economic pressures, Regina High School announced today that it would be closing its doors at the end of the 2009-2010 school year. Faculty and staff were informed on Friday by board of Directors Chair, Philip Mazanec. Letters announcing the closing have been sent to parents.

The school attributes the decline in enrollment to the economic realities of this recession and demographic shifts in the surrounding communities.

“The number of students in our area seeking a Catholic education is down by almost half since 1975,” stated Acting Principal Sister Margaret Gorman, SND. “But those students are served by about the same number of high schools.  With the job losses experienced by so many people in the past year, even fewer families can afford to choose a Catholic high school.”

Regina plans to continue with a strong college prep academic program for the remainder of the 2009-10 school year and will work with students, faculty and staff to make the transition as positive as possible for all parties. Over the coming weeks the school leadership will work with each student and her family to outline options and select an educational placement for next year. Letters are currently being mailed out to the school’s supporters and alumnae to inform them of the news.

Presently 217 young women are enrolled at Regina with 48 seniors anticipated to graduate in June 2010.

“After 56 years of educating young women for lives of leadership and service, we are committed to bringing the school to a close with dignity and grace,” added Gorman “There are thousands of women who have shared the common experience of Regina, and the school will continue to make an impact through these women.”

The school was started by the Sisters of Notre Dame in 1953 and moved to a sponsorship model with a governing Board of Directors in 2006. Regina was named a national School of Excellence by the U.S. Department of Education in 1991.

Please click here to view a copy of the Q&A.